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Bachmann LNER V2

Username
Paul Johnson 
 
Version
Bachmann V2 no 60800 ‘Green Arrow’ in BR late crest lined green 31-559 (Split chassis model)
 
Appearance
This Bachmann model falls into the ‘decent’ category: it has the dated split chassis construction and the body mouldings date from twenty years ago. Biggest weakness is the insufficient rendering of the three profiles tapering of the boiler, and the very weak rendition of the banjo dome; there’s a nasty seam on the boiler top that needs to be scraped down for best appearance.  But when it comes to a RTR V2 in OO, this is what there is. The mouldings otherwise are generally a little on the chunky side, and the bottom edge of the chassis block is low so there’s less light through the wheel spokes than there should be, the trailing truck has a large and inaccurate air gap above it. No NEM pockets for easy exchange to another coupler type. The livery is well applied, the model is in ‘bulled up’ condition with the hinge straps and smokebox door dart boss polished. (60800 was a Kings Cross Top Shed ‘pet’ engine, and was typically kept in good external appearance.) It looks well enough, helped by the fact that these were some of the best looking locos ever to run in the UK.
 
Detail
The detail is OK, chimney a bit blobby, as is the coal in the tender, glazing very recessed. Small moulded on parts like the smokebox dart can with advantage be easily replaced, adding a good cast chimney and dome also worthwhile, the latter requiring careful body surgery. There’s brake rodding and a painted crew to add.
 
Performance
Graunchy from the box. A few hours saw it become a smoother and slightly quieter runner, has ample speed and nearly enough weight for  traction to model the real thing’s performance. Got noisier as it wore in service, and now sounds like a coffee grinder though it still runs well enough. Great pick up, all loco wheels collect current. Derailed on points first time out too, due to an under-gauge pony truck wheelset, the only mis-set wheel I have ever had on a Bachmann loco – easily fixed.
 
Maintenance
It came with adequate grease on the moving parts, and has been cleaned and regreased as required. Regular cleaning out of the main axle bearings to remove the black mess, and replacement with a smear of fresh grease is the secret to keeping any Bachmann or Mainline split chassis type’s electrical pick up working efficiently. The moment the running deteriorates in any way, that’s where to look. They are pretty maintenance heavy as a result; with constant use they need this work every six months. A  Lenz silver was hard wired in, delivered the usual excellent control.
 
The traction was nearly there as received, especially once I had cut down the leading and trailing truck springs. Adding lead helps and requires a little surgery to the split frames. These had to come apart anyway for DCC fitting to isolate the motor terminals, so did it then. Extra weight won’t have helped the chassis werar and noise of course, but I needed the model able to pull like the real thing.
 
I have improved the model’s appearance in various ways: added dummy outside frames under the cab, and stripped the trailing truck of its cosmetic components and replaced with inside bearings so it runs inside all concealed. Added real coal on the tender, removed and replaced the glazing to make  it flush fitted, replaced chimney and dome. Worth doing these things to lift the looks.
 
Comments
This is the best of all the Bachmann V2s I own. Some of the others started out noisier...
 
Overall ranking
5.  Rather a dated model now, and the noise is not good. Looking forward to Bachmann renewing the chassis.
 
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Username
Paul Johnson
 
Version
Bachmann V2 no 60862  in BR late crest lined green 31-565 (revised chassis model)
  
Appearance
This Bachmann model falls into the ‘decentish’ category: the body mouldings date from twenty years ago. Biggest weakness is the insufficient rendering of the three profiles tapering of the boiler, and the very crude and underheight banjo dome; there’s a nasty seam on the boiler top that needs to be scraped down for best appearance.  But if you want a RTR V2 in OO, this is what there is. The mouldings otherwise are generally a little on the chunky side. The loco running gear looks better than the old split chassis, but not up to the standard of appearance of other recent Bachmann models. Paint, lining, lettering etc all very neatly applied.
 
Detail
The detail is mediocre, chimney a bit blobby, as is the coal in the tender, glazing very recessed. Small moulded on parts like the smokebox dart can with advantage be easily replaced, adding a good cast chimney and dome also worthwhile, the latter requiring careful body surgery. Rather basic chassis detail, doesn’t get close to their WD 2-8-0’s standard, one of the first better standard models they released a dozen years ago. There’s brake rodding and cylinder drains to add, the latter only if layout curves permit.
 
Performance
A smooth and quiet runner as received. Rather on the slow side when tested on 12V DC (these were very quick locos) of the two I tried out the faster proved just about capable of a scale 75mph on its own after a fair amount of running. It also lacks traction for a full size train. A V2 would take an 800 ton load up to 70mph, and a normal 400 ton passenger load (11 coaches) up to the normal 90mph line limit and faster when given the chance, and this model gets nowhere close to a scale representation of these speeds.
 
Maintenance
It was neatly greased on the moving parts, has the new style chassis with slimmer steel axles running in brass bearing collars. A  Lenz standard+ was hard wired in, delivered the usual excellent control. The traction was fair as received, anyone not going above 7 or 8  coaches or thirty wagons is likely to be happy enough. But in reality these locos were mighty, beyond what their size would suggest. Adding weight in the chassis voids especially up front, enable it to now pull as it should. The real trouble is that it is too highly geared, and simply won’t make the speed the real thing could achieve, and this gets worse once DCC fitted, top speed on mine DCC fitted about a scale 60mph. So it is only really fit for goods workings, or a passenger stopping train. Express performance is not to be had.
I have improved the model’s appearance in various ways. Added real coal on the tender, removed and replaced the glazing to make  it flush fitted, replaced smoke box door dart chimney and dome. Worth doing these things to lift the looks.
 
Comments
Way behind Bachmann’s accustomed standard.
 
Overall ranking
6.  Should be a much better model. Open goal for Hornby.
Review Hornby Bachmann 
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