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Graham Farish LNER B1

Username
Sean Mathews
 
Version
Graham Farish 372-077 Class B1 61251 'Oliver Bury' BR Lined Black Late Crest, 5-pole skew wound motor
 
Appearance
One of Graham Farish’s most recent releases, the 4-6-0 B1 does not disappoint.  At first appearance, the look of the locomotive is spot-on.  As with most of the latest Farish offerings, at a glance, it is hard to tell if it is OO or N gauge.  The tender is much closer to the body than that of the Standard 4MT.  The B1 is one beautiful looking model.
 
Detail
Again, there are numerous amounts of separately applied details.  It is becoming quite difficult for Bachmann to out-do themselves as they have reached a point where the most amount of detail possible has been applied.  There is even a coupling hook on the front of the B1, along with a set of etched metal nameplates that can be applied by the buyer on the Oliver Bury version I possess.  The Thomson designed B1 has always been one of my favorite LNER engines and this offering does little to disappoint.
 
Performance
Unlike its 4MT sibling, the B1 suffers none of the mechanical issues that plagued it.  Operation is silky-smooth.  The B1 is a capable hauler and can handle anything that a prototypical engine will run.  The motor is very silent and the gear moves realistically.
 
Maintenance
Maintenance is easy as in all of Farish offerings.  Running-in is a snap.  As with most Graham Farish locomotives, thirty minutes in each direction suffices.  DCC installation is also a breeze, as all of new Farish DCC ready locomotives are plug-in.
 
Comments
Overall, the Graham Farish Standard B1 is a beautiful locomotive and the first LNER locomotive to be represented in the new Blue Riband range.  Available in four liveries, one of which is weathered, the B1 will not disappoint and will find a home on many N gauge layouts.  Farish have also moved to a new package with the B1.  Gone is the grey foam which engines had to be pushed out of.  In its place is a plastic shell, similar to that used in rolling stock, which is removed from around the locomotive.  The change is for the better, as it is a much safer way to remove the locomotive.
 
Overall ranking
9/10 Pros: Beautiful, easy DCC installation, another winner from Farish. Cons: None as of now
Review Hornby Bachmann 
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